Enslaved at the Georgetown Hotel: Three Generations of the Clarke Family Feb 27th

Photo by citytevernclubdc.org
The City Tavern Club
The City Tavern Club

The City Tavern Preservation Foundation will present a special program on Thursday, February 27, 2020, at 6:30 PM given by Yvette LaGonterie: Enslaved at the Georgetown Hotel: Three Generations of the Clarke Family.

Yvette LaGonterie (Photo by: georgetowndc.com) Yvette LaGonterie

Ms. LaGonterie has retired from a 37-year federal career where she held senior positions in immigration policy and operations, international affairs, and homeland security. She currently serves on the Board of Directors of Reading Partners DC, a literacy organization that provides one-to-one tutoring to over 950 District of Colombia grade school students. She is also a Reading Partners tutor. Ms. LaGonterie earned a B.A. in Mass Communications, with a minor in African American History, and a Master’s degree in public administration. 

 

In her retirement, she is pursuing her interest in African-American history and genealogy by undertaking research on behalf of her extended family, connecting them with the historic building located at 3206 M Street NW, currently the home of the City Tavern Club.

 

The City Tavern Preservation Foundation is a 501(c)(3) organization established for the purpose of the historic preservation of the City Tavern building in Georgetown and for the provision of education and access to all.

 

The City Tavern Association was formed in 1959 as a private Club by several prominent Washingtonians to save this historically significant building from destruction by purchasing the building located at 3206 M Street and undertaking a full restoration of the 1796 tavern.

Reservations are required. Please email membership@CityTavernClubdc.org to secure a place.

1 Comment For This Article

Anonymous

Thank you for an excellent and well researched lecture on Thursday, February 27th. While emotionally troubling, the context and outcome of a lifetime of achievement shows the potential of suffering and the strength of the African American community. Well done.