Third Edition liquor license suspended over New Years

Photo by Third Edition
Third Edition
Third Edition

On Friday, December 14, 2011, the Alcohol Beverage Control Board (1ABRA) suspended the operating license of Third Edition restaurant at 1218 Wisconsin Avenue for five days to be served between December 29, 2011 and January 2, 2012. Andrew Kline, who represents many holders and applicants of liquor licenses, represents Third Edition in this matter.

"This is a clear signal from ABRA that this serious stuff, "ANC 2 Commissioner, Bill Starrels told The Georgetown Dish.

The closing order for this popular Georgetown establishment (open since 1969) stems from two occasions in 2011 where Third Edition failed to ascertain the legal age of drinkers and served alcohol to minors.

The history of violations cited against Third Edition dates back to 2004 and includes numerous instances of customers being assaulted and disorderly conduct by patrons. 

Cynthia Symms, community research officer at ABRA had this to say, "We don't comment on pending cases." Third Edition has until December 24 to file a motion for reconsideration. 

0 Comments For This Article

Anonymous

Kiwi's served a dubonnet and soda at that same spot to a young girl in 1962. Eighteen was the legal age then. Ah, the good old days!

Anonymous

That is the tip of the iceberg.

What about the blog: "ABRA and D.C. police officers found 20 fake cards last Thursday night at Third Edition" and the commentary: ".......knowing that most of the riff-raff is corralled into certain ID-lax establishments offers some comfort."

Consider "overnight" alteration of their facade sans permits or OGB approval, so they now have windows pivoting out on Wisconsin Avenue space.

Check the provenance of their representative.

"Tearing the envelope" is an understatement!

Anonymous

Just the tip of the iceberg:

Consider the report: "ABRA and D.C. police officers found 20 fake cards last Thursday night at Third Edition" and then the comment:
"But perhaps knowing that most of the riff-raff is corralled into certain ID-lax establishments offers some comfort"

And their overnight facade change without any evidence of DC permits or required OAG approval, so now their windows and noise open out on Wisconsin Avenue space.

Pull up the history of their representative.

Res ipsa loquitur!

Anonymous

Sad to say, but many of the underage students from Georgetown, GW, and American flock to Third Edition because it is so easy to get into. They basically "open up the doors and welcome anybody with or without an ID".

Dave Roffman

Damn, there goes my New Year's Eve....

Anonymous

Kline's bar license was suspended for "violating numerous Rules of Professional Conduct, chiefly 8.4(b) (committing a criminal act, forgery, that reflected adversely on his fitness as a lawyer), 8.4(c) (conduct involving dishonesty or deceit), 1.15(a) (commingling and negligent misappropriation), and 1.3(b)(2) (intentionally prejudicing or damaging a client during the course of the professional relationship)" http://caselaw.findlaw.com/dc-court-of-appeals/1552317.html

Perhaps Third Edition should be another representative.

Anonymous

To follow up on the previous commentator's post, Kline's bar license was suspended for "violat[ing] numerous Rules of Professional Conduct, chiefly 8.4(b) (committing a criminal act, forgery, that reflected adversely on his fitness as a lawyer), 8.4(c) (conduct involving dishonesty or deceit), 1.15(a) (commingling and negligent misappropriation), and 1.3(b)(2) (intentionally prejudicing or damaging a client during the course of the professional relationship)."

Anonymous

It's disappointing to me that this once thriving and classic Georgetown establishment has gone down the drain. Do the people who own this place even remember what it used to be? This place was always a college hotspot. Did it have to be stripped and gutted of all of its charm so that it could remain that way? Why does every college bar have to look like the basement of a frat house?

Anonymous

"Why does every college bar have to look like the basement of a frat house?"

So high school students know where to go for a drink??????????

P.S. This is such small potatoes. I remember when city liquor officials decided to check up on Annie Oakley's, a well-known trouble spot which used to be above the Banana Republic. There was a ten dollar cover charge that night. The first three officials handed over tens, the fourth a hundred dollar bill. The doorman reverted to standard practice and handed the guy a small bag of coke instead of his change. (The eighties in Georgetown were entirely special in a lot of ways!)