NYT: Strauss-Kahn case in question

Photo by The Georgetown Dish
Satellite trucks in front of the IMF when Strauss-Kahn was arrested
Satellite trucks in front of the IMF when Strauss-Kahn was arrested

The sexual assault case against erstwhile Georgetown resident Dominique Strauss-Kahn is on the verge of collapse as investigators have uncovered major holes in the credibility of the housekeeper who charged that he attacked her in his Manhattan hotel suite in May, according to a New York Times report.

Although forensic tests found unambiguous evidence of a sexual encounter between Strauss-Kahn, a French politician, and the woman, prosecutors now do not believe much of what the accuser has told them about the circumstances or about herself.

Since her initial allegation on May 14, the accuser has repeatedly lied, one of the law enforcement officials told the Times.

Anne Sinclair's house in Georgetown where she and Dominique Strauss-Kahn lived before his arrest in May (Photo by: Judith Beermann) Anne Sinclair's house in Georgetown where she and Dominique Strauss-Kahn lived before his arrest in May
Strauss-Kahn’s supporters have complained that U.S. authorities had rushed to judgment in the case. After his resignation as chief of the International Monetary Fund following the arrest, he was such a pariah that neighbors of an Upper East Side apartment building in New York objected when he and his wife tried to rent a unit there. They eventually rented a three-story town house in TriBeCa.

Strauss-Kahn's wife, Anne Sinclair, owns a house in Georgetown where the couple lived before the arrest.

Former French Finance Minister Christine Lagarde was named the new IMF chief this week.