Historic Houses highlight Christmas across two centuries

Photo by The Georgetown Dish
Jessica Selin-Williams with Nicky, husband Bob and Meg and the Seraphim Singers at Tudor Place
Jessica Selin-Williams with Nicky, husband Bob and Meg and the Seraphim Singers at Tudor Place
Q Street and the Buffalo Bridge connect Dupont Circle and Georgetown.  Saturday, these routes happily connected three of Washington’s most historic houses, Anderson House in Dupont Circle, Dumbarton House and Tudor Place in Georgetown. The three houses became a progressive house party, with buses taking partygoers to the next house.  Each house outdid the other with stunning Christmas trees and holiday decorations, cookies and drinks, activities for children, live music, including piano, violin and women’s quartet, and, of course, highly trained docents. 

Dupont Circle -- The Anderson House is the newest house in the trilogy, completed in 1905
One of the Christmas trees at Anderson House (Photo by: The Georgetown Dish) One of the Christmas trees at Anderson House
as the winter home of Lars Anderson III, an American diplomat, and his Isabel, writer and Red Cross volunteer.  Visitors step back into turn-of-the-century Gilded Age living and entertainment as they gaze on the original eclectic interiors, featuring carved wood walls, murals, papier-mâché ceilings, ornate iron work and intricate marble floors.  Anderson House is now owned by the Society of the Cincinnati, an organization founded in 1783 by American and French officers of the Revolutionary War to preserve the ideals for which they fought. Isabel Anderson arranged for the house to be given to the Society upon the death of her husband.

Georgetown -- Dumbarton House in the 2700 block of Q Street dates from around 1800 and is the headquarters of The National Society of the Colonial Dames of America of the American Revolution. Closely connected to the first years of the American Republic, it was acquired and completed by Joseph Nourse, first Register of the U.S. Treasury, who lived in it until it was bought by Charles Carroll.
 Janet Bullinger (left) is shown the rubberized kitchen floor in Anderson House installed to minimize noise and breakage. (Photo by: The Georgetown Dish) Janet Bullinger (left) is shown the rubberized kitchen floor in Anderson House installed to minimize noise and breakage.
  Carroll hosted Dolley Madison on August 24, 1814, during her flight from the White House and the British invaders. In 1915, when the Dumbarton ("Q Street") Bridge was built over Rock Creek, the house was moved 100 feet to its present site, to allow for the extension of Q Street into Georgetown Custis Peter, granddaughter of Martha Washington, it was the Peter family home for six generations.   The Georgetown DishThe Washington connection runs deep, with some 8,000 objects, including Martha’s tea table, a miniature portrait of George given to Martha Custis Peter and a letter from George to Martha conveying his sadness at their separation during the Revolutionary War.   Other Washington-related materials include his presidential dinner and dessert service, his campstool and furnishing for his bedchamber.
  
Georgetown --Tudor Place, with its magnificent gardens that slope down to the Potomac River, is on 31st Street, the farthest west of the historic trio.  Completed in 1816 by Thomas Peter and his wife Martha Custis Peter, granddaughter of Martha Washington, it was the Peter family home for six generations.   The Washington connection runs deep, with some 8,00objects, including Martha’s tea table, a miniature portrait of George given to Martha Custis Peter and a letter from George to Martha conveying his sadness at their separation during the Revolutionary War.   Other Washington-related materials include his presidential dinner and dessert service, his campstool and furnishing for his bedchamber.
 
Isabel, Rachal and Tim Pearson with Emily Schulz of Anderson House (Photo by: The Georgetown Dish) Isabel, Rachal and Tim Pearson with Emily Schulz of Anderson House


Docent Laura Belman of Dumbarton House is flanked by Mary Linders, left, and Many Jolly (Photo by: The Georgetown Dish) Docent Laura Belman of Dumbarton House is flanked by Mary Linders, left, and Many Jolly


Patrick Kidd of Tudor Place explains one of the rooms to Debra Wagner, Kimberly Bolen and Molly Johnson (Photo by: The Georgetown Dish ) Patrick Kidd of Tudor Place explains one of the rooms to Debra Wagner, Kimberly Bolen and Molly Johnson

 

The Seraphim Singers,Martha Lawrence, Charlotte Knapp, Phyllis Fong, Kathleen Peery, have just finished an Andrews Sisters song at Tudor Place.  (Photo by: The Georgetown Dish) The Seraphim Singers,Martha Lawrence, Charlotte Knapp, Phyllis Fong, Kathleen Peery, have just finished an Andrews Sisters song at Tudor Place.

0 Comments For This Article

Karen L. Daly

Thanks for coming out to visit Dumbarton House on Saturday, neighbors! Tomorrow, Wednesday, Dec. 8, we'll be hosting a Christmas Boutique from 11am-7pm with light refreshments all day (including wine from 5-7) to enhance your shopping experience!

Thanks too for the coverage, Georgetown Dish. Dumbarton House serves as the headquarters for The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America (no "Revolution" in our title), a nonprofit women's organization dedicated to historic preservation, patriotic service, and education. For more information on The National Society, please visit http://www.dumbartonhouse.org/nscda.htm.

Happy Holidays from your friends at Dumbarton House!
Sincerely,
Karen L. Daly, Executive Director

Ronda Bernstein

It was a great event. I hope they make it an annual tradition.

Heads up though, your formatting - or a cut and paste gone awry - has eliminated the end of the Dumbarton House section and moved Tudor Place info in:

... the house was moved 100 feet to its present site, to allow for the extension of Q Street into Georgetown Custis Peter, granddaughter of Martha Washington, it was the Peter family home for six ...