GU named District's #1 employer

Photo by The Georgetown Dish
Georgetown University
Georgetown University

Georgetown University was ranked #1 among the top 13 largest D.C. employers last year, according to the District's fiscal 2010 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, a required outside audit of the city's finances. GU moved up to first (replacing Howard University, which slid to #5), The George Washington University second, Washington Hospital Center third and Children's National Medical Center fourth, reports the Washington Business Journal.

School leaders say their ability to hire is hampered by campus plans that cap enrollment and employment, WBJ reported. GWU President Steven Knapp said so during a December jobs summit hosted by then Mayor-elect Vincent Gray. Mayor Gray, a GWU alumnus, responded during the summit that he wants to "sweep away those obstacles and open the door to making D.C. a more business-friendly place," an answer that sparked mild panic in university neighborhoods like Foggy Bottom, WBJ reported.

Vox Populi posted the news, attracting comments:

"And yet, we still get bullied by a few dozen vocal local residents… simply doesn’t make sense," said "David."

"How many of these employees live in the District? If they don’t, the District ends up paying for their services out of its own pocket, because D.C. can’t tax non-resident workers," wrote "George."

The District's other top employers, from sixth to 13th largest:

  • Georgetown University Hospital
  • American University
  • Fannie Mae
  • The Catholic University of America
  • Providence Hospital
  • Howard University Hospital
  • Sibley Memorial Hospital (a first time addition)
  • George Washington University Hospital

0 Comments For This Article

Peter Rosenstein

I think that we should know how many of the Employees of these Employers actually live in the District. That should be easy for them to report as they need to file tax forms with the jurisdicitions in which each employee lives.

We should find out how many are fulltime and how many are part-time or consultants or adjuncts. Also it would be interesting to see how many of the employees that live in the District are making above the $50,000 or in the top quarter of earners at these institutions and companies.

If we find that a majority of the employees are District residents it would strengthen the call for removing caps. On the other hand if the majority of the employees are from other jurisdictions and don't contribute to the tax base in the District raising caps may be looked at differntly.