GU Campus Plan Detailed

Photo by The Georgetown Dish
Bill Starrels, Ron Lewis, Mayor Gray and GU President DeGioia share a light moment after the campus planagreement was announced
Bill Starrels, Ron Lewis, Mayor Gray and GU President DeGioia share a light moment after the campus planagreement was announced

The detailed agreement between the community and Georgetown University on the Campus Plan was released  for comment and discussion on Thursday. The key elements of the seven-year plan, to end in December, 2017 are:

                --an undergraduate student cap of 6,675 on the main campus and an overall cap of 14,106 students, plus a “more accurate method for measuring enrollment semester-by-semester;”

                --moving 450 undergraduates on campus by fall, 2015, including from the townhouses on 36th Street NW so that these buildings can be used for faculty and staff housing or daytime administrative offices, and

                --an overall commitment to a “peaceful, quiet atmosphere” for the adjacent Georgetown, Burleith and Foxhall residential neighborhoods, including bringing “student social life on campus,” clear standards for off-campus behavior, a “commitment to explore” GU-sponsored graduate housing outside of these areas and relief from GU-related parking and traffic problems.

The Georgetown Advisory Neighborhood Commission 2E has scheduled a special meeting to discuss the plan on Thursday, June 14, 2012, 6:30 p.m, at Georgetown Visitation School, 35th Street and Volta Place, N.W.

The detailed plan is at: http://anc2e.com/proposedconditions.pdf

0 Comments For This Article

Anonymous

The main point of this battle has been whether a neighborhood can be exempt from obeying DC civil rights laws. Many residents, both student and non-student, have maintained the there is no basis for allowing housing discrimination anywhere in the District of Columbia, regardless of whether the area is near a university. Many neighborhood activists, including Jennifer Altemus and Hazel Denton, have claimed that non-discrimination is not a right, and they should be able to decide who has the "privilege" of living there.

Altemus, Denton, and other activists need to learn that they cannot decide to take away others' rights, regardless of race, socioeconomic status, matriculation status, or any other factor protected by the DC Human Rights Act. They have the opportunity to do so much good for the city, and instead of spending their time trying to roll back civil rights, it would be great to see them focus on fighting discrimination and trying to improve the quality of life for everyone.