Georgetown Friend Raiser to Save the C&O Canal

Photo by Judith Beermann
Nancy Taylor Bubes Hosts Georgetown Friends of  the C&O Canal
Nancy Taylor Bubes Hosts Georgetown Friends of the C&O Canal

Former DC Mayor Tony Williams (Photo by: Judith Beermann) Former DC Mayor Tony Williams

Wednesday evening marked the official launch of Georgetown Heritage, a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting and presenting the history of Georgetown. First order of business-- raising awareness of the acute need to fund improvements to preserve the historic C&O Canal.

Nancy Taylor Bubes graciously opened her elegant home to 60 friends, neighbors and business leader who share her interest in saving this national asset. Over cocktails and hors d'oeuvres, guests mingled before the remarks.

(Photo by: Judith Beermann)

Spearheading the efforts of Georgetown Heritage are Georgetown developer Richard Levy, Georgetown BID CEO Joe Sternlieb, Neil Mulholland, President and CEO of the National Parks Foundation and Superintendent of the C&O Canal Kevin Brandt.

Richard Levy announced the formation of Georgetown Heritage to "protect and tell the history" of this industrial waterway turned national park. The first step in building a coalition is to engage residents, the National Parks Service, non-profit groups, and business interests to plan for the future of the Georgetown section of the C&O Canal.

C&O Canal NHP Superintendent Kevin Brandt (Photo by: Judith Beermann) C&O Canal NHP Superintendent Kevin Brandt

Special guest, and long-time supporter of Georgetown, former DC mayor Tony Williams urged everyone to support "this important cornerstone of our city."

Tony Williams looks on as Richard Levy addresses the guests (Photo by: Judith Beermann) Tony Williams looks on as Richard Levy addresses the guests

After thanking former DC mayor Tony Williams for his continuous efforts, Sternlieb explained, "One thing I've learned is that when the community comes together with city government, you can do anything." The first phase in restoring 'Georgetown's Crown Jewel' as the project is described in  the BID's Georgetown 2028 15 Year Plan  is to fix the lock and build a new boat. "That will cost $9 million, he explained "and why we're here having this friends raiser."

A short film was shown. From a commercial port started in 1828 by George Washington to open up the country to the west, to the creation of the C&O Canal National Historical Park by Richard Nixon in 1971, the Canal has been an integral part of Georgetown life. "For 40 years, the one mile section of the Canal in Georgetown was a popular destinations for visitors, residents, and school field trips, with mule-drawn boat tours providing an authentic, immersive experience."

Georgetown BID CEO Joe Sternlieb looks on as C&O Canal Film shown (Photo by: Judith Beermann) Georgetown BID CEO Joe Sternlieb looks on as C&O Canal Film shown

Georgetown Heritage plans to raise $3 million each from the community, the city and the park service.

Nancy Taylor Bubes with David Romm and Jennifer Altemus (Photo by: Judith Beermann) Nancy Taylor Bubes with David Romm and Jennifer Altemus

For more information, visit Georgetown Heritage.

1 Comment For This Article

Anonymous

Im not sure how building a new boat and pulling tourists up and down saves the canal. Please, as residents and business owners, address the trash and litter problem first. Last year I saw the kind employees of Patagonia on Wisconsin put on their boots and wade into the canal and rid it of bags and bags of garbage. This is want I call community effort and effective help for the canal. At the same time I saw Pinstripes patrons toss cigarette butt after cigarette butt into the canal along with their napkins and waste. That, on the other hand, is appalling. There is a large fine for this kind of littering, yet I have never see anyone enforcing it. I realize the National Parks service is stretched for resources, but fining businesses and their patrons for littering is a source of revenue that is overlooked.