Amuse Bouche

GW Bees do it for Founding Farmers

June 24, 2011

Partnering with George Washington University, Founding Farmers restaurant is establishing the largest known restaurant-owned urban apiary in the country. The restaurant installed six beehives on the roof of Lisner Hall, an academic building on the GW campus that sits just two blocks away from the restaurant.

While the bee colony won’t yield honey immediately (they expect production of each hive to reach up to 120 pounds by next year), in addition to culinary uses, GW’s biology department will use the hives for research, specifically analyzing the pollen the bees bring back and tracking the exact flowers the bees visit.

The GW & Founding Farmers bee colony housed atop Lisner Hall on GW's Foggy Bottom campus. (Photo by: Jessica McConnell Burt) The GW & Founding Farmers bee colony housed atop Lisner Hall on GW's Foggy Bottom campus.

“This urban apiary is a natural extension of Founding Farmers’ mission to minimize its impact on the environment through sustainable practices,” said Dan Simons, Principal of VSAG, the restaurant consulting and management firm for Founding Farmers. “Not only do we love being able to harvest our own honey to supplement our restaurant’s usage, but we are proud to partner with GW — a powerhouse in the world of education — on a project like this.”

”We are pleased to partner with Founding Farmers in this exciting new endeavor,” said Peg Barratt, dean of GW’s Columbian College of Arts and Sciences. “This venture provides an opportunity to not only further expand the university’s research goals and enhance our students’ educational experiences, but play an active role in encouraging local sustainability and green living.”

GW biology professor Hartmut Doebel tends to the bees (Photo by: Jessica McConnell Burt) GW biology professor Hartmut Doebel tends to the bees

In addition to creating the apiary, Founding Farmers also established a $5,000 scholarship that will be awarded to an undergraduate GW biology student who will oversee the apiary for the next year.  The scholarship is the second that Founding Farmers has created for the university. Earlier this year, the restaurant awarded the first annual $5,000 Scholarship for Sustainable Hospitality, which is awarded to a student attending the GW School of Business. 

Visit Founding Farmers for honeybee updates and follow the bees on Twitter @FFbees.


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Colonial bread-maker joins Rose Park farmers

June 22, 2011

If you’re one of Bill Duran’s lucky dogs, Rose Park is the only place to be on Wednesday afternoons. Besides freshly made cookies and fresh water, this season, the farmers' market has some very special new human treats too.

Bill Duran and friends (Photo by: Judith Beermann) Bill Duran and friends

On his wife Julie’s 14th generation farm in Sudlersville, Maryland, Jimmy Reynolds makes bread, the real old fashioned way ... from the family’s wheat, King Arthur flour, water, salt, and yeast.  As Jimmy explained, “We started to go  colonial. We grow our own wheat. Why not add it to the dough?” Magnolia Bread Company's artisanal loaves are sold around the region, and now here in Georgetown.

Jimmy Reynolds breaks bread (Photo by: Judith Beermann) Jimmy Reynolds breaks bread

Fresh from the Congressional picnic at the White House, Winifred “Fredi” Schulties of Quaker Valley Orchards is back again this year with berries, honey, apples and new this week, nectarines. “It was exciting to meet the President and First Lady, and we were honored that ours was one of the farms selected for this year’s state fair theme,” explained Fredi.

Fredi and daughter of Quaker Valley Orchards (Photo by: Judith Beermann) Fredi and daughter of Quaker Valley Orchards

Susan Limb of Praline Bakery & Bistro (also new this year) offers French-American baked goods and gourmet meals. “Everything is baked from scratch,” said Susan.

Susan Limb of Praline Bakery & Bistro (Photo by: Judith Beermann) Susan Limb of Praline Bakery & Bistro

Alice and Jim Breger of Anchor Nursery from Galena on the eastern shore of Maryland (Photo by: Judith Beermann) Alice and Jim Breger of Anchor Nursery from Galena on the eastern shore of Maryland

Eric Marlow, Katies Lipp, Mike Zisa and Tim Whitney enjoying Italian ices (Photo by: Judith Beermann) Eric Marlow, Katies Lipp, Mike Zisa and Tim Whitney enjoying Italian ices

Joelle and Christian Fournier of Les Caprice de Joelle (Photo by: Judith Beermann) Joelle and Christian Fournier of Les Caprice de Joelle

In its ninth season, the market is open every Wednesday from 3:00 until 7:00 pm (rain or shine) from mid-April until the last Wednesday in October at the corner of O and 26th Streets.

Dog Day Afternoon (Photo by: Judith Beermann) Dog Day Afternoon

If you are interested in helping, please contact roseparkmarket@yahoo.com.

(Photo by: Judith Beermann)


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