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Katherine's Weekly Market Recipe: Tabouleh with Chick Peas, Seasonal Vegetables and Lemon Garlic Vinaigrette

August 7, 2012

This recipe is always a huge hit. There are many potential variations: Try using Quinoa instead of Bulgur or Soy Beans instead of Chick Peas. Use Tarragon in place of basil. Every vegetable in the recipe - the tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, sweet onions, garlic, and basil - can be found at the local Farmers Markets at Rose Park on Wednesday or Dupont Circle on Sunday. The possibilities are endless! This is a naturally vegan recipe. But for the meat lovers, it's great with grilled chicken or seafood on the side

Today is the second of  "Katherine's Weekly Market Recipes," in The Georgetown Dish, all of which are designed to be delicious, easy, quick, family-friendly, nutritious (heart-healthy & diabetes-friendly), and to highlight produce found at our local Farmers Markets this week. At your Farmers Market, you'll find produce picked at peak ripeness, which means maximum flavor, texture and nutrition. You're also helping save the environment when you buy at your Farmers Market. Here's how...

Tabouleh with Chick Peas, Seasonal Vegetables and a Lemon Garlic Vinaigrette
By Katherine Tallmadge, M.A., R.D.
 
Makes about 6 - 300 calorie servings
Time: 20 – 30 minutes
 
1 Cup Bulgur (Cracked Wheat)
1 15-ounce Can Chick Peas, drained
1 Large cucumber, skinned and seeded, chopped
1 Large Yellow Pepper, seeded, chopped
1 Sweet Onion, chopped finely
1 pint sliced Cherry Tomatoes or Chopped Heirloom Tomatoes
1 Large Handful Fresh Basil, chopped
Optional:
¼ cup golden raisins
¼ cup roasted pine nuts
 
Vinaigrette:
Juice of One Lemon (2 Tbsp) and its lemon zest
2 Tbsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil
1 crushed Garlic Clove
Kosher Salt and Freshly Ground Black Pepper
 
In a large glass bowl, pour 3 cups boiling water over the bulgur and let sit for 15 minutes or longer. While the bulgur is fluffing up, make the salad: In a large glass or plastic bowl, dump in the chick peas, the chopped cucumber, pepper, onion, tomatoes, basil, raisins and pine nuts. Make the vinaigrette in a separate small bowl: roll the lemon on the counter and place in microwave for 30 seconds (this procedure extracts the maximum juice). Let cool. With a microplane, zest the lemon being careful not to use the bitter white pith. Squeeze the lemon juice and place with zest in the small bowl. Add the olive oil, garlic, salt and pepper. Whisk together. Drain the bulgur and add to salad. Toss in the vinaigrette. Chill and serve, or serve immediately.
 
Note: This recipe can be made ahead of time and will keep nicely in the refrigerator for a week. If you decide to make this as a "batch," for you or your family, a cooking technique I recommend in my book, Diet Simple, and which makes eating healthy a pleasure, I recommend leaving the tomatoes out of the recipe until it is served. To me, refrigeration ruins tomatoes!
 


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Katherine's Weekly Market Recipe: Greek Salad with Heirloom Tomatoes

August 1, 2012

When I was young, one of my most vivid memories is the taste of my Grandmother’s vine-ripened tomatoes.  Every year, she would grow at least 20 tomato plants -- and only tomatoes --  in her back yard in Columbus, Ohio.  They were her favorite vegetable (though technically a fruit), and became mine too.  I’ll never forget how soft, plump, sweet and deep red they were.  Definitely not today’s traveling kind.  They were the kind you picked and ate, still warm from the day’s sun. The kind which you can only get from your own back yard - or the Farmers Market.

Today is the first of  "Katherine's Weekly Market Recipes," in The Georgetown Dish, all of which are designed to be delicious, easy, quick, family-friendly, nutritious (heart-healthy & diabetes-friendly), and to highlight produce found at our local Farmers Markets this week. At your Farmers Market, you'll find produce picked at peak ripeness, which means maximum flavor, texture and nutrition. You're also helping save the environment when you buy at your Farmers Market. Here's how...

For this week's "Greek Salad with Heirloom Tomatoes," buy your tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, onions, and garlic at Wednesday's Rose Park Farmers Market or Sunday's Dupont Circle Farmers Market, which just celebrated its 15th year. Congratulations Fresh Farm Markets!
 

Greek Salad with Heirloom Tomatoes
By Katherine Tallmadge, M.A., R.D.
Author, “Diet Simple: 195 Mental Tricks, Substitutions, Habits & Inspirations” (LifeLine Press, 2011)
www.KatherineTallmadge.com

8 servings

Ingredients: 

Vinaigrette:
2 Tablespoons Freshly Harvested Extra Virgin Olive Oil
2 Tablespoons Freshly Squeezed Lemon Juice (1 Lemon)
1 Tablespoon Chopped Fresh Oregano or Basil (or 1 tsp dried)
1 Clove Garlic, Minced (optional)
Salt and Pepper to Taste (Salt is not necessary with the cheese and olives)

Vegetables:
2 cucumbers, peeled, seeded and sliced into a half-moon shape
1 onion, peeled and chopped coarsely
1 medium yellow, purple or green bell pepper, cored, seeded, chopped into large bite-size pieces
1 cup pitted Kalamata or other Greek Olives
4 Heirloom Tomatoes, quartered, and cut into large, bite-size pieces

4 ounces Feta or Goat Cheese, broken into small bits

Instructions: 

Combine the vinaigrette ingredients in a large salad bowl and whisk until blended. Add the cucumbers, onion, pepper, and olives and toss into vinaigrette. Let sit for twenty minutes to marinate. Add the heirloom tomatoes and cheese when ready to serve.

Tomatoes

Tomatoes are one of the "superfoods." Men who consumed 10 or more servings of tomato products a week had a 35% decrease in risk of prostate cancer relative to those who consumed 1.5 servings or fewer per week.  This is largely attributed to “lycopene” in the tomatoes, which is also in other red fruits such as watermelon, pink grapefruit and guava.  Men with lycopene levels in the top 20% had a 46% decrease in risk of heart attack compared to those in the bottom 20%.  Lycopene is a potent scavenger of gene-damaging free radicals. But don't expect to get it from a supplement. You must eat the tomato as you need the whole food to receive the benefits! Here's why...

If you would like to have one of your recipes highlighted by Katherine in The Georgetown Dish, please email Katherine with your recipe for testing, along with the story behind your recipe. All recipes must be heart-healthy and diabetes-friendly. Send to: Katherine@KatherineTallmadge.com


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Swedish Midsummer Magic

June 18, 2012

This time of year, I long to be in Sweden. I’ve had a life-long love affair with Sweden, its culture, cuisine, and people. I’m so grateful that finally the world has caught on that my beloved Sweden is a recognized culinary destination.

Swedish cuisine is the ultimate “nouvelle” cuisine. It is simple, fresh, and is naturally local and seasonal. It’s elegant, yet down-to-earth, which is also a perfect description of the Swedish people, and even Swedish design.

The daughter of a Swedish mother and an American father, I’ve been visiting Sweden since a little girl. During my regular visits, I soaked in every possible aspect of Swedish food and cooking. I took many fishing trips in the Baltic Sea on my Uncle Olle’s small motor boat. I received early lessons on cleaning, smoking, grilling, pickling – and any method one could name – of preparing fresh fish.

I was raised in the Swedish culinary tradition. I’ve picked wild blueberries, strawberries and mushrooms in the Swedish archipelago, then watched as my grandmother (mormor) and Aunt Ingrid prepared treats with the bounty. Growing up, I and my mother dined regularly on crepes with lingonberries and cream – one of my favorite dinners (though now I use yogurt instead of cream! Naturligtvis!). I’ve delighted in all the unique foods my family introduced me to: the grainy rye breads, the special cheeses and yogurts, the smoked reindeer meat, the delicate, sweet, and tiny Swedish shrimps, caviar, crayfish, and of course, meatballs and lingonberry sauce!

If you are not a Swede or Scandinavian, you may not know that summer is the most special time of year. For weeks on end the sun never sets in Sweden’s summertime. It’s daylight round-the-clock.

Every year, during one of those “white nights” – the Friday nearest the 24th of June – the nation turns out to feast until morning. After long winter months of what seems like never-ending darkness, sun-starved Swedes join the rest of Scandinavia in celebrating the summer solstice – the year’s longest day.

Swedes call the celebration Midsummer Eve.

It is more than just a holiday, however. Midsummer Eve, often lasting through Saturday – and sometimes the whole weekend – is the national excuse for the biggest parties of the year. The revelry is non-stop.

Learn more about Midsummer and Swedish Midsummer recipes...

 


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