Living Lite

Nutrition for Strength, Bones & Balance: Free Lecture April 18

April 17, 2013

Bad news about aging: Starting in your 30s, your body begins losing muscle, bone mass, strength, and balance. This puts your health, energy, and ability to age gracefully in serious danger.

The good news: You can change this very real and scary picture with what you eat - and some of the news is surprising: For instance, saving your bone and muscle mass may have nothing to do with how much protein, calcium, or vitamin D you consume or even weight-bearing exercise you do! This is new and exciting state-of-the-art science. Hear my Georgetown Village lecture tonight - while nibbling on tasty appetizers and drinks - about how you can maximize your muscle, bone mass, strength and balance through nutrition.

Who: Katherine Tallmadge, M.A., R.D. President, Personalized Nutrition / Author, "Diet Simple" / Georgetown Dish Contributor
Sponsored by: Georgetown Village
When: Thursday, April 18, 2013 at 6:30 pm
Where: St. John Episcopal Church's Blake Hall, 3240 O Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20007
RSVP: Lynn Golub-Rofrano  lynn@georgetown-village.org  or  202.999.8988
Cost: FREE


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A So Called 'Bad' Food is Actually Good For You

March 26, 2013

My clients regularly ask me: "Should I be eating eggs? My doctor tells me they're 'poison' and to avoid them as they'll increase my cholesterol and heart disease risk." My response: "That's OLD NEWS!" Thought of as a bad-for-you food for decades, scientific research is shedding new light on the truth about eggs.

Eggs don't deserve their bad reputation. Their high cholesterol content has been thought to play a role in increasing LDL (bad) cholesterol and heart disease risk. But cholesterol in food is a minor factor contributing to high blood cholesterol for most people, and studies - including a recent review of 17 studies - have not confirmed a correlation between eggs and increased heart disease risk. The major determinant of LDL cholesterol is saturated fat, and while eggs are high in cholesterol - 184 milligrams in the yolk - they're relatively low in saturated fat - about 1.6 grams in the yolk.

Interestingly, some of the biggest egg eaters in the world, the Japanese, have low cholesterol and heart disease rates, in part because they eat a diet low in saturated fat. In contract, Americans tend to eat eggs alongside sausage, bacon and buttered toast, suggesting the meal pattern is the culprit - not the egg.

"The amount that one egg a day raises cholesterol in the blood is extremely small," says Walter Willett, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at Harvard's School of Public Health. "Elevations in LDL cholesterol of this small magnitude could easily be countered by other health aspects of eggs.

Watch me discuss eggs' health benefits on CNN, learn more about the recent research, and details about how eggs are good for you


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The 'Heart Ball' Raises Record Funds

February 27, 2013

The generous and enthusiastic crowd at this year's American Heart Association "Heart Ball" gave $1,350,000 in gifts overall, with the best live and silent auction in its history ($188,000 raised). When the auctioneer opened the bidding for “Open Your Heart” gifts - straight donations that go directly to the mission - another $100,000 was raised at the National Building Museum, where the annual event was held on Saturday night.

The Wixted Family Sharing Their Story with The (Photo by: Erin Scott Photography) The Wixted Family Sharing Their Story with The "Heart Ball" Audience

The audience was clearly moved by the story of young Cooper Wixted (held by his father in the photo above), the American Heart Association's 2013 "Face of the Heart," who survived Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome after life-saving heart surgery.

Dancing Until 1 am (Photo by: Erin Scott Photography) Dancing Until 1 am

"There was a lot of energy, and the young professionals that joined the party at 10:00 pm really had a good time," said Kara Laing, Director of Development of the American Heart Association. "We were there dancing until 1:00 am!"

The Persuasions Entertained the Crowd after Dinner (Photo by: Erin Scott Photography) The Persuasions Entertained the Crowd after Dinner

Mike Girardi (Girardi Wealth Management), Katherine Tallmadge (The Georgetown Dish/Personalized Nutrition) (Photo by: Mark Indre) Mike Girardi (Girardi Wealth Management), Katherine Tallmadge (The Georgetown Dish/Personalized Nutrition)

Katherine Tallmadge (Georgetown Dish/Personalized Nutrition) with Mark Indre (Marriott International) and Josh Short (Hay Adams Executive Pastry Chef) (Photo by: Mike Girardi) Katherine Tallmadge (Georgetown Dish/Personalized Nutrition) with Mark Indre (Marriott International) and Josh Short (Hay Adams Executive Pastry Chef)

Katherine Tallmadge (Georgetown Dish/Personalized Nutrition) with Phil and Andrea Armstrong (Total Wine and More) (Photo by: Mike Girardi) Katherine Tallmadge (Georgetown Dish/Personalized Nutrition) with Phil and Andrea Armstrong (Total Wine and More)

Katherine Tallmadge (Georgetown Dish/Personalized Nutrition) with Artist, Tina Palmer and Tony Cord (Photo by: Mike Girardi) Katherine Tallmadge (Georgetown Dish/Personalized Nutrition) with Artist, Tina Palmer and Tony Cord

Rob Franklin, Open Your Heart Committee Chair, Matt Voorhees, Heart Ball Chair, and George Stone, Auction Committee Chair (Photo by: Erin Scott Photography) Rob Franklin, Open Your Heart Committee Chair, Matt Voorhees, Heart Ball Chair, and George Stone, Auction Committee Chair


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