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Karin Tanabe's 'The Price of Inheritance'

July 27, 2014

“I wanted to write a book that was equally a love story and a mystery” says The List author, Karin Tanabe about her second novel, The Price of Inheritance, to be released August 5th.

When The Georgetown Dish sat down with the multi-lingual, globe-trotting writer, the topic soon turned to the inspirations for her theme, locale and characters. This Georgetown-based former journalist, drawing from The Red Violin, a film about how an instrument affected lives it touched over the centuries, "wanted to tie this story together around an object.”

Karin Tanabe outside The Capella Hotel in Georgetown (Photo by: Judith Beermann) Karin Tanabe outside The Capella Hotel in Georgetown

“And as an art lover, I’ve always been interested in art crime,” says Tanabe. “It’s about scoundrels and gangsters who don’t want to get their hands dirty. It sounds genteel but it’s not.” Smiling, she adds, “Collateral for drug dealers … and the art can never be shown anywhere.”

Gobbled up in the New York auction world, The Price of Inheritance's main character, Carolyn, following a scandal, is fired from her job, moves to Newport, Rhode Island, buys an innocuous piece of pottery and falls in love with a soldier.

Too much of a thrill ride to give away any more here, but suffice it to say, Tanabe’s stylish, and oh so timely page-turner takes her heroine on more than one journey of discovery.

Ever the scholar and perfectionist, this Vassar alum did her homework. “The most fun I had was finding a Newport Gilded Age mansion. Once the characters and story were sketched out, I went there to fill in the blanks for local flavor. I named the house ‘Morningstar’ after one of my favorite books, Marjorie Morningstar by Herman Wouk."

(Photo by: simonandschuster.com)

As for the piece of pottery, she consulted auction dealers and researched the many treasures discovered at Goodwill and flea markets. “The pottery needed to be not overtly available, or recognizable.” For the military piece, Tanabe enlisted the help of a Judge Advocate General friend. As for Carolyn’s love interest, “Yes, I drew inspiration from my husband for Tyler.” she admits.

What gives The Price of Inheritance its nuanced depth is a message of ethical justice set against the authentic tableaux of the antiques market, Gatsby-style Newport, and American military law.

Asked whether she’s thought about which actors she’d like to see play Carolyn and Tyler on screen, she confesses to having found them already, albeit anonymously “by going to a modeling agency sight to pick out people who looked exactly like my characters.”

Karin Tanabe will be at Politics and Prose August 9th for a book-signing. For more information, and to purchase her book, click here.


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Designer of Interiors, Ezio Mattiace Launches Arte Modus

July 21, 2014

TECNO. Executive Office furniture. Tecno furniture is made in Como, Italy. (Photo by: Ezio Mattiace) TECNO. Executive Office furniture. Tecno furniture is made in Como, Italy.

For Ezio Mattiace, after 11 years, the time was right. Having introduced Poltrona Frau, one of Italy’s premier furniture firms to Washington DC, Mattiace was looking to expand. Representing one company, however exquisite their product line, meant that his discriminating clientele might miss out on some incredible pieces.

“With Arte Modus LLC, the company I founded earlier this year,” says Mattiace, “I’m able to scout incredible pieces, anything from 18th century hand-made desks to contemporary Jake Dyson lighting because of my knowledge of the designers and their companies.”

rclinea Kitchen, Line: Lignum and Lapis. Desing: Antonio Citterio.  Finish: Mahogany. Finish: Polished steel cabinetry. Arclinea  kitchen are made in Vicenza, Italy. (Photo by: Ezio Mattiace) rclinea Kitchen, Line: Lignum and Lapis. Desing: Antonio Citterio. Finish: Mahogany. Finish: Polished steel cabinetry. Arclinea kitchen are made in Vicenza, Italy.

Before he suggests any product, whether it’s a chrome office chair, a hand carved wooden mirror or a Solid Ray acrylic kitchen, Mattiace first checks out the company and where the product is made.”Designers come from the four corners of the globe, but if you’re making a beautiful product, it better be made in your country,” he says emphatically.

Ezio at Tecno desk (Photo by: Judith Beermann) Ezio at Tecno desk

When you visit his new Georgetown showroom in Canal Square, you’ll see his coherent and consistent vision of what a contemporary room could look like.

Representing four Italian leaders of contemporary design who share his philosphy: Arclinea, Tecno SPA, Alivar and Alias, Mattiace also currently sources from a dozen others. Now able to “engage in the whole design process, using all the tools available,” this designer of interiors is able to dazzle his clients here and abroad with four centuries of furniture design.

“It’s all about the client, the place and the time, in that order," explains the smiling Arte Modus designer.

Arte Modus LLC is located at 1054 31st Street, Suite 9. Tel: 202.333.4161. Showroom open by scheduled appointment.

NOMOS. Design: Norman Foster and Partners, England. Made in Italy by TECNO. Top in crystal clear tempered  oval  glass. Frame in chrome plates steel. (Photo by: Ezio Mattiace) NOMOS. Design: Norman Foster and Partners, England. Made in Italy by TECNO. Top in crystal clear tempered oval glass. Frame in chrome plates steel.


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The City of Light: Paris 2014

July 17, 2014

(Photo by: Judith Beermann)

There's no bad time to visit Paris, but if you want to see why they call it The City of Light (La Ville-Lumière,) come for La Fête Nationale (the French National Day).

The city's nickname, often misnamed 'City of Lights,' originated during the Age of Enlightenment when Paris was the center for education and ideas. In 1828, Paris began lighting the Champs-Elysées with gas lamps, the first city in Europe to do this.

(Photo by: Judith Beermann)

As if their gifts to the world of wine, love, food, and fashion aren't enough, the French put on a sound and light show nonpareil.

Commemorating the beginning of the French Revolution with the Storming of the Bastille, and celebrating the unity of the French people on July 14, 1790, the national holiday ends with a magnificent fireworks display at the Eiffel Tower starting at 11:00 pm (it's not dark till then).

This year's theme, Guerre et Paix (War and Peace) included live opera and a symphony orchestra. 

We thought we had 'good seats' directly under the Eiffel Tower, but the city was ablaze and best captured in this video.

The pyrotechnic/musical extravaganza, filled with Cirque du Soleil acrobatic magic and illuminations capturing a proud country's turbulent history, ended with John Lennon's "Imagine."

Vive La France!

 

 

 


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