Runaway Spoon

Monaco Opens New Chancery

December 13, 2017

To paraphrase a famous song title, Monaco’s Ambassador Maguy Maccario Doyle is now an intown girl.

Isabella Rosabrunetto (l), Ambassador Jamie McCourt, Ambassador Doyle, Marie Catherine Caruso Ravera (Photo by: © Embassy of Monaco) Isabella Rosabrunetto (l), Ambassador Jamie McCourt, Ambassador Doyle, Marie Catherine Caruso Ravera

So intown that the principality’s new chancery is just several blocks away from President Trump’s White House. 

The ambassador welcomed guest after guest -- including the new U.S. Ambassador to France and Monaco, Jamie McCourt -- December 7  to celebrate the opening of the elegantly modern space in the Brawner building right in the power-based center of the city on 17th Street NW. The old chancery was many blocks away in the Van Ness neighborhood, which didn’t boast of many upscale restaurants for entertaining. 

Isabelle Rosabrunetto (l), and Portugal Amb. Domingos Ferzas Vital and Mrs. Vital (Photo by: © Embassy of Monaco) Isabelle Rosabrunetto (l), and Portugal Amb. Domingos Ferzas Vital and Mrs. Vital

Ambassador Doyle happily noted that she now has access to great eateries near DuPont Circle and K Street.

From her sun-filled office she also can glance out the windows to observe diplomatic limousines coming and going from the White House.  On snowy days, she needs no car. She can just walk over there. 

Explorer Dr. Enric Sala of the National Geographic & Washington Post journalist Mary Jordan (Photo by: © Embassy of Monaco) Explorer Dr. Enric Sala of the National Geographic & Washington Post journalist Mary Jordan

Ambassador McCourt, who was sworn in earlier this month in the Oval Office, is a former co-owner and executive of the Los Angeles Dodgers. Other special guests were two of Monaco's senior foreign relations representatives, Mme. Isabelle Rosabrunetto, director-general of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation, and Mme. Marie-Catherine Caruso Ravera, director of the Department of Diplomatic and Consular Relations.

Wolf Trap CEO Arvind Manocha (l), Amb. Doyle, & Gideon Malone (Photo by: © Embassy of Monaco) Wolf Trap CEO Arvind Manocha (l), Amb. Doyle, & Gideon Malone

Also sharing the limelight were philanthropist/businesswoman Sheila Johnson and her husband, Judge William T. Newman.  Johnson is co-founder of BET and is CEO of Salamander Hotels and Resorts.  To a guest, Johnson alluded to a joint culture venture in the city of New Orleans with Monaco. No further details were related at that time.

Tomas Abreu & Marie Catherine Caruso Ravera (Photo by: © Embassy of Monaco) Tomas Abreu & Marie Catherine Caruso Ravera

Also spotted:  Kosovo Ambassador Viora Citaku, American architect Theo Adamstein,  Tomas Abreu, Monaco's honorary consul in Miami, and Cindy Hoddeson, director of the Monaco Government Tourist Office in New York.

Embassy interior (Photo by: © Embassy of Monaco) Embassy interior

The Brawner building is one of DC’s best. As guests entered a reception area, they were greeted by videos of Monaco’s famed casinos  --  opposite that wall was a water garden well stocked with decorative Koi fish.  


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To Brazil for the Love of Music

December 11, 2017

“We never had a plan,” chuckled artistic entrepreneur Sabine Lovatelli, who co-founded one of the most successful music and arts theaters as well as teaching institutes/festivals in South America.

Aniko Gaal Schott, Gail Scott, Mary Bird (Photo by: Michelle Beliveau) Aniko Gaal Schott, Gail Scott, Mary Bird

That amusing confession came as Countess Lovatelli was feted Sunday night at the Foxhall home of her friends of 47 years, Aniko Gaal Schott and Nash Schott, where some 75 guests were introduced to the theatrical wonder woman. Those at the reception included Jose Luiz Machado E Costa, Brazilian Ambassador to the OAS; Bill and Lynda Webster, Candy Stroud, Kevin Chaffee, Roland and Diane Flamini, Tandy Dickerson, Alexandria de Borchgrave, Gail Scott, Mary Bird and representatives from the Hungarian and other diplomatic communities.

That haphazard will-o’-the-wisp cultural notion blossomed into an artistic phenomenon.

Lovatelli, German-born and Brazilian by choice, has now been recognized for promoting cultural exchange between Brazil and German, and other nations, too.   Her love of music began while she was very young, in her hometown of Jena, Germany. She has lived in Brazil since 1971.

All are invited to come and visit Săn Paulo from March 3-10 to attend Musica Em Trancoso. Want to go? Information here.

Jose Luiz Machado E Costa & Countess Sabine Lovatelli (Photo by: Michelle Belieau) Jose Luiz Machado E Costa & Countess Sabine Lovatelli
In 1981, she founded the now well-regarded Brazilian Mozarteum, an entity that advances concerts and classical ballets.  It has held more than 607 international and 355 national events, many of which are free to the public.   Renowned orchestras and performers from France, Israel, the United States, Germany and elsewhere have been on stage at the Brazilian venues.

Lovatelli  coordinates with the Baccarelli Institute, which has a music school and a community orchestra in Heliópolis, a poor district in the city of Săo Paulo. The Mozarteum promotes education in this community. There, first-rate artists give lessons to young beginners and music students without cost.

Music of all genres is heard and taught from opera to show tunes to classical to jazz to soul and, as Lovatelli said, next up:  rap. 

Lovatelli and her husband, businessman Carlo, have been honored by the Brazil-Germany Chamber of Commerce and Industry for their efforts to strengthen the economic and cultural ties of the two countries.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Time Magazine Names Silence Breakers Person of The Year

December 6, 2017

Tarana Burke, founder of (Photo by: Natalia Janetti) Tarana Burke, founder of "Me Too" movement

Tarana Burke, founder of the “Me Too” Movement spoke at Politico’s Women Rule Summit in DC Tuesday, and urged "no tolerance" for abusers.

Time Magazine named The Silence Breakers 2017 Person of the Year on Wednesday.

Said Time:  “The women, and men, who broke their silence to share their stories of victimization gave traction to the #MeToo Campaign, which took off on social media and fueled a worldwide discussion on just how endemic sexual harassment has been.”

In its introduction of Burke, Politico praised her:

“Burke has worked in social justice and Black arts and culture for more than 20 years.  Her long and varied professional career started in Selma, Alabama, where she worked with the 21st Century Youth Leadership Movement helping to develop hundreds of youth leaders; at the National Voting Rights Museum as executive director of the Black Belts and Cultural Center.”

In her talk, Burke said there should be “no tolerance” of harassment in any segment of business or society.  She lamented that in so many instances, such as in the Harvey Weinstein mess, so many people did not come forward sooner because they were “invested in power.”

Time said activist Tarana Burke created the “Me Too” movement in 2006 but the hashtag went viral after actress Alyssa Milano shared it in a tweet a few months ago.


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