Runaway Spoon

Philanderer to Philanthropist

July 30, 2019

Wish Man, the film about the hard-drinking and womanizing motorcycle cop who eventually started the Make A Wish Foundation will be shown at the Australian Embassy in DC on Tuesday August 6 at 6:30 pm. 

The film’s message is that everyone can be goodhearted. Each ticket  -- admission $75 -- includes light appetizers and alcoholic and nonalcoholic beverages.

Proceeds go to furthering Flicks4Change Film Festival’s Mission: to bridge the gap between and awareness and meaningful social change. “This is accomplished by bringing effective nonprofit organizations, socially conscious filmmakers and an audience together at Flicks4Change film festivals,” said festival director James Hawthorn.

The film about Frank Shankwitz’s journey from philanderer to philanthropic founder stars Flicks4Change co-founder Andrew Steel.

The embassy is at 1601 Massachusetts Ave., NW.  There is limited street parking so ride-share is encourages.

A government issued photo ID is required for entry.

Click here for tickets.

For more information, contact: festival director James Hawthorn, James@flicks4change.org or 571.438.4026


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Jose's Words: One Plate at a Time

June 13, 2019

Chef José Andréis a guy who gets it done.  No frills, not much talk. Feed the hungry. Dish up the meals. Period!

His modest description captivated his 400+ fans at the CAREs Global Leaders Network Awards Tuesday night at the United States Institute of Peace in Washington, D.C., hosted by USIP President Nancy Lindborg.

UAE Amb. Yousef Al Otaiba, Michele Flournoy, & former Amb. Abdulwahab Alhajjri (Photo by: CARE's Global Leaders Network) UAE Amb. Yousef Al Otaiba, Michele Flournoy, & former Amb. Abdulwahab Alhajjri

"We began with a very simple idea, that no man or woman should be left behind, forgotten, without that simple plate of food, " he said.

"Sometimes I see people sitting around all day in a living room trying to solve very complex issues.  But sometimes the most complicated issues have very simple solutions: when you are hungry; when you are thirsty, the only thing you have to do is find the food, find the helpers, find the kitchen and start cooking -- one plate of food at a time can be the beginning of solving the big problems of humanity."

"We need to remember, people don't want our pity. People want our respect, and sometimes our respect is not paying them. but...showing up next to them and listening to what they want from us and making them a part of the change we want to seek." 

Patricia Elwood, chief of Protocol and International Affairs or DC Government, chats with Jose Andres (Photo by: CARE's Global Leaders Network) Patricia Elwood, chief of Protocol and International Affairs or DC Government, chats with Jose Andres

He said sometimes we want to impose our solutions but he said the solutions are "right there" all the time.

In a tribute to CARE, Andrés said his work started with the basic idea of what CARE does around the world to help others -- as he termed it  "on the wings of CARE." 

He called his own organization the most "unplanning" group around.  When they get to the distination is when they see what's needed.

Jordan’s Ambassador Dina Kawar rightly called the World Central Kitchen founder/president, who is up for a 2019 Nobel Peace Prize, “a world-class humanitarian and a world-class chef."

Sherrie Beckstead, women political leader Daryl Glenney, and arts activist Barbara Hawthorn (Photo by: CARE's Global Leaders Network) Sherrie Beckstead, women political leader Daryl Glenney, and arts activist Barbara Hawthorn

“Andrés has served millions of meals to those in need both in the United States and across the globe.  From free meals to the first responders of the California wildfires to feeding 3.5 million people in Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria…

“Like CARE, José uses the power of food to connect and strengthen communities and economies in times of need, using local food sources, local vendors and businesses, and local volunteers wherever and whenever possible in his humanitarian work.”

Rep. Joaquin Castro received the CARE Global Leader Award from CARE COO Tjada D'Oyen McKenna (Photo by: CARE's Global Leaders Network) Rep. Joaquin Castro received the CARE Global Leader Award from CARE COO Tjada D'Oyen McKenna

In awarding him CARE’s Humanitarian Award, Ambassador Kawar said Andrés’ recent trip to Jordan “says so much about him as a person: he took his family to see the traditional sights of my country—Petra, the Dead Sea—but he also took them to visit with numerous women and refugee food entrepreneurs, from small farmers to restaurant owners to small business startups."

“This is who he is – deeply curious and always seeks to connect and lift up those around him.”

Former Sen. Sam Nunn presented Michèle Flournoy, former undersecretary of Defense, with the CARE 2019 Global Peace, Development & Security Award. 

Calling her a true modern-era Wonder Woman, Nunn said Flournoy, co-founder and managing partner of WestExec Advisors, is “a trailblazing leader of efforts to create a safer and better world….Her civility and grasp of substantive issues has earned her the respect of leaders across the political spectrum.”

Former Sen. Sam Nunn in conversation with Ellen Ford and (on left) UAE Amb. Yousef Al Otaiba (Photo by: CARE's Global Leaders Network) Former Sen. Sam Nunn in conversation with Ellen Ford and (on left) UAE Amb. Yousef Al Otaiba

CARE also honored Sen. John Boozman, Ark., Sen. Chris Coons, Del., Rep. Joaquin Castro, Tex., Sen. Lisa Murkowski, Alaska, and Sen. Marco Rubio, Fla.

In her introduction, CARE’s CEO and President, Michelle Nunn, warned that progress for global security and combating poverty is under threat.

 “Progress is now under threat across the world… authoritarianism has made a strong comeback…there are more refugees now than at any time since the end of World War II… laws on refugee protection and resettlement are now severely strained…terrorism persists and the effects of dramatically changing climate are accelerating the suffering of the world’s most vulnerable populations.”

CARE's Global Leaders Network leader Beth Solomon, Michele  Flournoy & Amb. Abdulwahab Alhajjri (Photo by: CARE's Global Leaders Network) CARE's Global Leaders Network leader Beth Solomon, Michele Flournoy & Amb. Abdulwahab Alhajjri

So, Nunn said: “It’s a moment that calls for brave political leaders willing and able to chart a new course for international cooperation to tackle today’s problems.”

In closing ceremony, UPS Foundation executive Joe Ruiz presented CARE with $1 million to use for its humanitarian causes, the global company's largest gift to CARE in history.

Among the attendees were members of the diplomatic corps, journalists, business executives,  representatives of government staffs, and D.C. officials.

Jose Andres with former Amb. Abdulwahab Alhajjri (Photo by: CARE Global Leaders Network) Jose Andres with former Amb. Abdulwahab Alhajjri

CARE Amb. & actress Bellamy Young of ABC's Scandal presents Global Leaders award to Sen. John Boozman (Photo by: CARE's Global Leaders Network) CARE Amb. & actress Bellamy Young of ABC's Scandal presents Global Leaders award to Sen. John Boozman
Sen. Chris Coons receives honor from Michelle Nunn (Photo by: CARE's Global Leaders Network) Sen. Chris Coons receives honor from Michelle Nunn

UPS's Joe Ruiz announces $l million gift to CARE for its philanthropic endeavors. (Photo by: CARE's Global Leaders Network) UPS's Joe Ruiz announces $l million gift to CARE for its philanthropic endeavors.


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Celebrate Moms & Grads With Historic Key Jewelry

May 5, 2019

 Inspirational, classy – and limited -- luxury key jewelry from The Lockkeepers Collection is making a fashion mark around town.

This custom jewelry is the brainchild of DC-Maryland-Virginia area jeweler Sherrie Beckstead.

Lockkeeper's House (Photo by: Trust for the National Mall) Lockkeeper's House

The keys were inspired by the original keys that lockkeepers of yesteryear used to open the big locks along the C&O Canal waterway. The new fashion-forward keys are smaller, of course. And, some are studded with black or white diamonds. Some are worn as necklaces, others as brooches or lapel pins.

These keys are for those who want something special for mom, wife, nana, or any important woman in your life – no matter the occasion. The beauty of the jewelry will awe new graduates. 

For the guys, there will be cufflinks for that upscale business shirt. But wait a second, these links work equally well on a woman’s blouse cuffs. The first small delivery of Cufflinks sold out in 2 weeks, the next arrival is just in time for Father’s Day.

The jewelry is available at The Lockkeepers Collection.  Price range from $1,995 to $2,495 for key necklaces of rose gold, white gold or yellow with or black or white diamonds.

 A sterling silver collections prices range from $75 to $650.

Also on the drawing board is a separate lock necklace that takes its cue from the original locks on the C&O Canal, and inspired by local history.

Beckstead’s design for the collection was motivated by the Lockkeeper’s House story and her love for American history and education. The Lockkeeper’s House, constructed in 1837 and 350 square feet in size, is the oldest building on the Mall. Sherrie serves on the National Advisory Council for the Trust for the National Mall.

The C&O Canal extends 184 miles from Georgetown to Cumberland, Maryland. Several years after the canal opened, an eastward extension was built to link the canal to the Potomac River and the Washington City Canal. The house was built near what is now the southwest corner of 17th Street NW and Constitution Avenue to serve the extension’s lock.

(Photo by: lockkeeperscollection.com)

The lockkeepers who occupied the house worked as a toll collectors, record keepers, traffic managers, and maintenance men. Their locks, and others along the canal, such as next to 30th Street in Georgetown, enabled the canal’s narrow barges to navigate the 76-foot increase in water elevation as the canal climbed from the low levels of Washington into Maryland.

The canal was essentially a commercial operation from its opening until 1924, when it surrendered to the competition of the railroad. It then gradually became a tourist attraction, boosted by Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas’ hike of its entire length, and then in 1971 by a new law creating Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historic Park.

To help support the Lockkeeper’s House and other historic elements of the Mall, 50 percent of each sale from The Lockkeepers Collection will be donated to the National Mall Trust.

 


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